Sofia Deputy Mayor Resigns over Kindergartens E-Enrolment Blunder

Politics | February 11, 2008, Monday // 00:00| Views: | Comments: 10
Bulgaria: Sofia Deputy Mayor Resigns over Kindergartens E-Enrolment Blunder Sofia Education Deputy Mayor Yordanka Fandakova resigned Monday over the failure of the e-system for enrolment of children in the capital's kindergartens. Photo by Darik News

Sofia Education Deputy Mayor Yordanka Fandakova resigned Monday over the failure of the e-system for enrolment of children in the capital's kindergartens.

The official internet site, used by parents, who want to reserve places for their kids in a kindergarten, was overloaded due to an attempt of sabotage of the e-registration service, the company that created the site explained last week.

A total of 5,000 out of 12,000 children will not be taken to a kindergarten because of the lack of free places, data showed.

"I resign as I am obliged to take my managing responsibility, especially when the interests of so many people are concerned" Fandakova said.

More than 80% of the parents managed to enroll their children within six hours on February 4 before the system was blocked. Some of them tried to reserve a place more than once, which is among the possible reasons for the failure.

About 300 adults signaled over shifts in the candidates' positions.
Politics » Be a reporter: Write and send your article
Advertisement
Advertisement
Expats.bg All Are Welcome! Join Now!
Please, log in to post a comment.
» To the forumComments (10)
#10
CJB - 13 Feb 2008 // 15:29:27

"CJB, yeah I know this. But this where being a stupid englishman and not knowing how to offer a bribe lets me down. We spoke to the director and tried to make it clear to her we are quite willing to make a "donation". Didn't mention anything specific though. She just sat there with a plain face as if to say "f*ck off anything below several 1000 levs isn't going to make me move my little finger on the mouse". I'm sure most haven't bribed too much to get in there, but I just have no idea how to offer a bribe and how much it should be. "

Did you ask her what she may need to make running the kindergarten easier? That might work. It's also possible you've run into one of the rare public officials who don't take bribes, but I doubt it...

"Can't they just have a price list? :-P"

That would spoil all those hours of coming up with offers, negotiating, and we'd lose all that etiquette that goes along with it: the posturing, the slightly naughty schoolchildren atmosphere...

This is culture we are talking about!

#9
Robin - 13 Feb 2008 // 13:38:11

CJB, yeah I know this. But this where being a stupid englishman and not knowing how to offer a bribe lets me down. We spoke to the director and tried to make it clear to her we are quite willing to make a "donation". Didn't mention anything specific though. She just sat there with a plain face as if to say "f*ck off anything below several 1000 levs isn't going to make me move my little finger on the mouse". I'm sure most haven't bribed too much to get in there, but I just have no idea how to offer a bribe and how much it should be.

Can't they just have a price list? :-P

#8
CJB - 12 Feb 2008 // 19:55:15

"I think the internet based enrollment was to try and circumvent the corruption involved in getting a place in the first place. We have to drive our child half way across plovdiv to get her to her Kindergarden. Despite the fact that we live within 500 yards of three others around here. But they are all "full" - full that is with kids being driven in in big Mercs and BMWs. Everybody's driving their kids to Kindergarten because no one can get into the local one it seems. Very clever..."

Robin, as a local businessman there is an easy way to solve this problem. Make an appointment to see the Director of your nearest kindergarten. At the meeting, say that you'd like to make a donation to the kindergarten for the children: does not have to be cash, maybe a product that you sell. If you work in IT it could be a new computer for the Director's office, for example. Once this friendly gesture of support has been gratefully accepted in principle, then ask about a place for your little one. Miraculously, a place will become available!

Trust me, it works.

#7
just me - 12 Feb 2008 // 18:27:02

ah- I see. Thanks, JKS.
How interesting. Admission to these types of "schools" is very, very competitive here, so we face the same problems and the same line of luxury cars at the good ones. However, they're not publicly funded at all in our case, so there's no particular expectation of admission to one or another. I've heard of people getting their kids on waiting lists at conception. ;) Anyway, thanks for helping me understand the situation in BG.

#6
JKS - 12 Feb 2008 // 17:41:56

What Robin is referring to is what we call "day care" or "pre-school". They are usually split up into 2 groups. 1-2 year olds go to "manger" school and 3-6 years go to "kids garden".

#5
just me - 12 Feb 2008 // 16:59:11

Interesting, Robin. It's too bad she can't attend one closer to home. And I assume that families could end up driving all over town to get their various kids to school. Here you are entitled to attend the public schools in your area; and IF there are extra spaces people from other districts can apply for them. That makes sense, IMO, and would be better for the environment.

Is "kindergarten" in Bulgaria what I think of as elementary school, i.e., from about age 5 to age 9 or so?

#4
Robin - 12 Feb 2008 // 16:00:25

I think the internet based enrollment was to try and circumvent the corruption involved in getting a place in the first place. We have to drive our child half way across plovdiv to get her to her Kindergarden. Despite the fact that we live within 500 yards of three others around here. But they are all "full" - full that is with kids being driven in in big Mercs and BMWs. Everybody's driving their kids to Kindergarten because no one can get into the local one it seems. Very clever...

#3
just me - 12 Feb 2008 // 15:55:12

She took the fall, but did anyone really take responsibility? What are they going to do with the 5,000 extra kids? Even if registration on the e-system had been successful, how would they have accommodated the other 42% of eligible children? The whole thing sounds fishy to me. How many were enrolled last year? Did they really believe that there was that large of a decline in enrollment?

I also find it peculiar that the enrollment system for kindergartens is internet-based in a country as "poor" and lacking in infrastructure as Bulgaria. Wouldn't it be better to spend the money on basic education needs than internet enrollment systems? We don't even have that in either of the outstanding US school districts in which I've enrolled my child.

#2
Dirk - 12 Feb 2008 // 10:33:23

=> The official internet site, used by parents, who want to reserve places for their kids in a kindergarten, was overloaded due to an attempt of sabotage of the e-registration service, the company that created the site explained last week.

overload ??? on what mini server did they put it ???

if this overload explanation,comes from the same copany that made the site... it might be a poor excuse only

Anyway, respect for Yordanka, for taking responsibility

#1
Robin - 12 Feb 2008 // 10:09:59

Whilst I don't like to see people loose their jobs at least this person has held her hand up and said: "Yes, my mistake - I take responsibility for this." Well done. (She doesn't by any chance have shares in the company responsible for creating the system?)

Bulgaria news Novinite.com (Sofia News Agency - www.sofianewsagency.com) is unique with being a real time news provider in English that informs its readers about the latest Bulgarian news. The editorial staff also publishes a daily online newspaper "Sofia Morning News." Novinite.com (Sofia News Agency - www.sofianewsagency.com) and Sofia Morning News publish the latest economic, political and cultural news that take place in Bulgaria. Foreign media analysis on Bulgaria and World News in Brief are also part of the web site and the online newspaper. News Bulgaria