EP: Free Movement of People in EU Not Negotiable

Politics » BULGARIA IN EU | January 12, 2014, Sunday // 14:52| Views: 2235 | Comments: 1
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EP: Free Movement of People in EU Not Negotiable: EP: Free Movement of People in EU Not Negotiable EP President, Martin Schultz, photo EPA/BGNES

The European Parliament declared that rules on freedom of movement were completely non-negotiable, and made clear that attempts to change them would be blocked, writes the UK The Observer.

According to the article, the European Parliament's President, Martin Schultz, has said that while he took UK demands for reform of the EU "very seriously" there was no question of the parliament agreeing to reopen the rule-book on free movement.

The German Social Democrat has noted he would like to see UK Prime Minister David Cameron's plans for EU reform, and wanted the UK to remain inside the EU to shape policy on everything from climate change to the single market and development policy.

Schultz underscored that such treaty change "needs unanimous support and ratification of all member states" and would also need to pass through the European Parliament, where it would almost certainly be blocked.

"As to the debate on free movement, this is happening not only in the UK but across many member states. The principle of free movement of people has been one of the greatest successes the EU has, it is a fundamental principle and it's not up for negotiation any more than renegotiating the principle of the free movement of goods, services or capital," the EP President is quoted in saying.

The entire article read HERE.

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#1
joppy - 12 Jan 2014 // 22:50:08

"climate change to the single market and development policy." The former is bunch of made up BS by some high-ego Western wannabe scientists thinking they understand everything about how the world works and thinking that it is man jobs to control (or hinder) the natural process of the planet. The latter is good for the larger more powerful states such as the UK, Germany and France but extremely detrimental to the weaker members Bulgaria and Romania.

"it's not up for negotiation any more than renegotiating the principle of the free movement of goods, services or capital" I will be willing to negotiate with the UK on the former if we can negotiate on the latter.