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Bulgaria MP Yanev: Numerous Southern Villages Are Converted to Islam by Force

Politics | March 3, 2009, Tuesday // 00:00| Views: 11788 | Comments: 27
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Bulgaria MP Yanev: Numerous Southern Villages Are Converted to Islam by Force: Bulgaria MP Yanev: Numerous Southern Villages Are Converted to Islam by Force Girls from the village of Ribnovo, in Saudi Arabian attire, are pictured after taking a class on radical Islam. Photo by BGNES

Despite Bulgaria's European Union membership, some regions of the country need a second liberation from Ottoman yoke, the Bulgarian Member of the Parliament (MP), Yane Yanev, stated, cited by the Bulgarian news agency, BGNES.

Yanev, who is the leader of the opposition "Order, Law, Justice" Party (RZS) spoke Monday in Blagoevgrad as reported by the local BGNES correspondent.

The leaders of RZS visited Monday several villages in Southern Bulgaria to meet with alarmed teachers and parents, who have presented concrete evidence of the imposed conversion to fundamentalist Islam in the region.

The example of the village of Ribnovo, in the Gurmen municipality, has been presented as the most striking one. In Ribnovo, the school principal, Feim Issa, had imposed full dictatorship on the teaching staff, forcing them to wear traditional Muslim clothes, and encouraging female student to the same. Issa has been illegally appointed as principal with help of the local mosque's leaders and is actively supporting the religion teacher at the school, Murat Boshnak. Boshnak is, reportedly, an individual with suspicious past and unclear educational background. He is not holding even a Bulgarian high school diploma, but has graduated from a religious school in Skopje, Macedonia. Ribnovo residents allege that Boshnak has specialized in Saudi Arabia and is forcefully making parents to sign requests for their children to study the Islam. He is also demanding that children address him as "aga' instead of "gospodin" (Mister), had prohibited girls from attending the last prom in civil attire and issued a ban on celebrations. Boshnak later organized a trip to Turkey with funds from an Arab foundation. Only one girl had attended the prom. Parents, who refuse to follow the fundamentalist rules, are being cursed during services in the local mosque.

Yanev had established similar examples in the village of Satovcha, where the school principal regularly attended classes in radical Islamism in an illegal local fundamentalist school. The principal was currently on maternity leave and, in order to keep the school under control, had appointed her own husband to replace her.

The residents of the villages visited by Yanev are not Turks; they are all Bulgarian-Muslims, speaking only Bulgarian language.

The RZS leader stated he was appalled by the extreme violations of the rights and freedoms of Bulgarian citizens, embedded in the Constitution. RZS distributed to the media video postcards, showing how radical Islam is quickly taking roots in the country, under the courteous watch of the ruling tri-party Coalition.

Yanev and his colleague Dimitar Abadzhiev vowed to signal the State Agency for National Security (DANS) about the citizens' rights violations in the region, which, they say, are sabotaging European values and leading the way of Islam in Europe.
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» To the forumComments (27)
#27
CreepyS - 6 Mar 2009 // 12:27:10

WW,

I did the same like you, and still do, in a way that I believe is suitable for me.

Both the abilities and the goals change with time for most people - in the last 15 years or so I was mostly interested to do what I like abroad and that was a right decision because it was impossible to do this in BG. Now my interests shifted to other things and with the advancement of the technology it becomes the less and less important where you are physically so I believe there is no harm to try and do something in BG. Technically, Im a Belgian national living abroad but I dont feel like I want to get back to Belgium.

As for the emigration, I noticed there is a kind of "one-two" process in countries like China, south Korea or India - when the country is down many people are out and when the country starts to develop some people get back and many of those who go out in the upside period go mainly to study to get a well payd job in their country after a few years. I see step one for BG but not yet step two.

#26
JKS - 5 Mar 2009 // 18:32:11

"Speaking of the "clear vision" of the foreigners in BG concerning the problems in BG and cumming with solutions, I like to say that I disagree with your statement and agree with WW. She put it very well by comparing it with the view one gets from observing a straight line from an airplane."

From where I stand neither expat Bulgarians, Foreigners living in BG, or Bulgarians living in BG have the "correct" solutions. Most of the diagnosed problems(many) and in turn solutions(much less) come from their background/daily life.

For example some one say from Germany here doing business finds the biggest problems being corruption and inefficiency.

Whereas some foreigners living here and raising a family might find the biggest problems the lack of good sidewalks to bush strollers on etc.

For me working for a religious foundation that works primarily with orphans the biggest problem in BG is the lack of strong social/religious institutions/influence. (more complicated than that:)

In one sense they are all right. I am not sure there should be a division about who is more accursed in their diagnosis other than on the individual merits.

or not...

#25
DP - 5 Mar 2009 // 18:04:42

“In both of the above cases i dont see how long term emigration can solve anything for BG.”

Creepy,

The nature of any emigration (long or short) is such as it has much to do with the problems in the societies of the countries being abandoned by its people and represents the cumulative result of the individual solutions to more or less common problems. It is not a deliberately created occurrence for the solving of the problems of the country of origin of the immigrants. So here is the futility of your quandary expressed in the above statement of yours.

As long as we continue to nourish the herd mentality and demand that individual’s needs are not important we will remain a nation with third world country mentality.

Before I go on with my next comment I would like to say that I am generalising, therefore it does not refer to all foreighn expats residing in BG.

Speaking of the "clear vision" of the foreigners in BG concerning the problems in BG and cumming with solutions, I like to say that I disagree with your statement and agree with WW. She put it very well by comparing it with the view one gets from observing a straight line from an airplane.

#24
WickedWitch - 5 Mar 2009 // 17:23:11

*It

#23
WickedWitch - 5 Mar 2009 // 17:21:31

Nobody is saying that emigration would solve anything for the country. I does solve some of the problems of the emigrants. I don't believe in reincarnation or heaven or anything after death. I believe in living my life to the best of my abilities and my goals. I cannot do this in Bulgaria. I find a country where I can do this and thus my problem is solved. That's all.

(I'll reply to your first two points when I get home because it's a longer response.)

#22
CreepyS - 5 Mar 2009 // 16:51:18

I can speak of what I know - In my profession, engineering and research, i see that the people who stayed in the country have done quite okay in terms of careers but didnt do much to learn new things and didnt change much because the bar is so low compared to what we have abroad. Without new people trained elsewhere we go nowhere. So the lack of decent competition and standards looks like a problem to me.

As for the BG culture, it is subpar and will remain like this for a long time because of the tastes and the interests of the people left in the country - again it looks like new ideas and values are more than welcome but there are no people who are interested to adopt them overnight.

In both of the above cases i dont see how long term emigration can solve anything for BG.

#21
WickedWitch - 5 Mar 2009 // 15:28:44

"One of the reasons why the average mentality here is sh!t is the fact that the people who actually have political power, educate, run the economy, etc. dont face decent competition so they dont need competences and qualifications and do whatever they want because the BG people who could be a competition and do better are not in BG."

No. Just no. That is complete crap. The reasons are way more complicated and the result of many factors.

"Basically WW says that because she is very sophisticated, she doesnt want to look at sh!t and thats why she lives in someone elses country but of course this wont make the sh!it go away until someone actually cleans it up."

Oh dear. Looks like we have a lazy armchair analyst in the house. I am not saying I am sophisticated. I am saying that I am normal, well-adjusted, intelligent human being. I am not saying I am over par; I am saying that Bulgarian culture is subpar. See the difference?

"Its funny that people who are born and raised in a developed country and live now in BG see better what needs to be done than the BG immigrants."

At least they think they do. You know how you see a straight line from the plane and when you get on the ground it turns out to be all loopy and zigzaggy? A lot of those "enlightened" foreigners are still on that plane.

#20
CreepyS - 5 Mar 2009 // 12:08:27

Off course to study abroad and work abroad for a while is a good thing for everybodys development. But as far as the country is concerned this serves for nothing if this experience is not transfered home after some time.

Some nations take the fact that they are second rate and poor very personally and work to change that, but not we - the only cheap trick weve learned so far is just to leave and its normal that things dont change as rapidly as everybody wants.

#19
CreepyS - 5 Mar 2009 // 12:00:38

One of the reasons why the average mentality here is sh!t is the fact that the people who actually have political power, educate, run the economy, etc. dont face decent competition so they dont need competences and qualifications and do whatever they want because the BG people who could be a competition and do better are not in BG.

Thats how the scum took over the country and it will be very difficult to drive these people out.

Basically WW says that because she is very sophisticated, she doesnt want to look at sh!t and thats why she lives in someone elses country but of course this wont make the sh!it go away until someone actually cleans it up.

Its funny that people who are born and raised in a developed country and live now in BG see better what needs to be done than the BG immigrants.

#18
Dutch - 5 Mar 2009 // 10:11:30

"Yeah, that still won't change the attitudes of the arseholes and the chalga bling-bling walking pen!s/vag!na culture overnight. Till that changes, many of us are staying out."

Not that I approve that culture, not at all, but I do know that that same culture exists abroad as well, it's not uniquely reserved for BG. Also....staying away and hoping for miracles to happen without contributing yourself in a direct manner is also not a good attitude? I understand the reasons why Bulgarians (or any nationality for that matter) have left their mother country and that many still do. But in case someone has the desire to make a change, I think one should be presenting in person in the country where the desired changes should be applied. Casting a vote every four years, venting your opinion on the internet and sending money back home is imho not enough. Especially BG needs Bulgarian nationals with foreign experience. Maybe you yourself don't notice, but in general I do notice a big difference, and not only because of the language skills, between Bulgarians who have never left the country and those who have been around, whether it was for study, for work or both.

#17
WickedWitch - 4 Mar 2009 // 23:01:35

Nellie,

Cheesy is the right word. In this culture sex is not enjoyed for what it is and can be but as a coin to measure your self-worth. And, like a coin, it's all minted out and stamped in the same form over and over. And, just like a coin, it's just a random representation of the real thing. Hell, sex is completely disconnected from the physical act of sex by now. It's the Nokias and the hair extensions and the pale lipstick with a dark pencil around. Fvck that sh!t (no pun intended).

#16
NellieotAmerica - 4 Mar 2009 // 22:50:28

WW

I second that opinion. Too much of Bulgarian culture and life style is too cheesy and too degenerate for words. lol

#15
WickedWitch - 4 Mar 2009 // 20:37:57

"Oh, wait.....in the (unlikely) event that BG becomes the most wealthy country in the world"

Yeah, that still won't change the attitudes of the arseholes and the chalga bling-bling walking pen!s/vag!na culture overnight. Till that changes, many of us are staying out.

#14
NellieotAmerica - 4 Mar 2009 // 18:32:14

Dutch boy

"I bet you've had enough opportunities to return in those years, but you did not take them."

My ex did - and I divorced him and remained in the US to raise my kid. He went to dabble in agriculture and co collect EU agricultural subsidies. For all I know, some of the missing SAPARD funds might have found their way in his wallet. He is probably fully mutrified by now, driving his MB at breakneck speeds and banging Bulgarian hookers. I don't know, we don't speak.

"Time to come back to BG and to actually change things, instead of shouting from a safe distance "how bad this" and "how bad that". Very often the same though.....many Bulgarians living abroad (those with no intention to return to BG for good) have the biggest mouths."

I am DOING something to change things, I am VOTING for Volen Siderov.

"Oh, wait.....in the (unlikely) event that BG becomes the most wealthy country in the world"

It is not going to happen.

"All BG expats will be elbowing for taxi's at Sofia airport. Hypocrites!"

HAHAHAHA! It is DEFINITELY not going to happen. Who is gonna babysit my future grandchildren?

#13
NellieotAmerica - 4 Mar 2009 // 18:13:29

van4eto

"I am disgusted by LDS bugging my elderly parents by �visiting’ them year after year ( over 10 years so far) even though they have explicitly been asked politely NOT to do that because they are not wanted in our home!"

Seriously? Where is your parent's traditional Bulgarian hospitality? Where I come from in Bulgaria, if a stranger calls on you, you invite him in, offer him a glass of rakija and a shopska salata and chat with him. Mormons won't take rakija, but yogurt or milk is appropriate refreshment.

I've never had Mormon missionaries visit me. Jehovah's witnesses, on the other hand, visit me on a regular basis and leave pamphlets at my door if I am not at home. They are usually very polite and respectful.

Utah has some of the best skiing on earth, I love Utah and all the hot Mormon kids on snow boards. Sport is one of the few pleasures they are allowed to have, so they all go for it and look amazing as a result.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HavwkKdWa-c

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