The Times: Young Bulgarian Employee is Bright, Educated, Delight to Work With

Society | February 2, 2009, Monday // 00:00| Views: | Comments: 59
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The Times: Young Bulgarian Employee is Bright, Educated, Delight to Work With: The Times: Young Bulgarian Employee is Bright, Educated, Delight to Work With The young Bulgarian student Aleksander Todorov lives in a world of potatoes, the British daily "The Times" says in an article published Sunday. Photo by Times Online

The young Bulgarian student Aleksander Todorov lives in a world of potatoes, the British daily "The Times" says in an article published Sunday.

The young Bulgarian hopes to become one day a computer specialist in the US, but "in the meantime he is in economic exile in Britain, living, eating, sleeping potatoes, and dreaming of the day he will see his family again," the author writes.

Aleksander is in the UK since December and lives with other student potato packers in a caravan in a farm, North of Dundee.

Aleksander has been nicknamed by his bosses Eck, because he is seen by them as an honorary Scot, someone who does not fit the common perception that migrant workers are the bottom of the labor market - "nameless, downtrodden foreigners passing through, doing the grotty jobs none of us want to do," the publication points out.

"Workers like Aleksander are bright, educated and a delight to work with," the student's boss is quoted as saying.

Aleksander works hard because the potato farm gives him the opportunity to meet people, improve his English, and earn money - four times of what he could make in Bulgaria, according to the student himself.

The ultimate goal - end up in the US.

Aleksander is one of the people, who contribute to 700 tons of potatoes being processed at the farm each week, but he told "The Times" he did not like the food in the UK - the one single thing that he had remotely criticized.

The full text of "The Times article can be found at: http://www.novinite.com/view_news.php?id=100901
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» To the forumComments (59)
#59
countryhick - 4 Feb 2009 // 16:14:15

Food is not so expensive but of very low quality.

Food in Bulgaria is of a poor quality. English food that you buy in a supermarket is TOP QUALITY. If you are a cheap skate and buy of the markets or Paki stores then it is of course lower quality. However ALL UK FOOD IS BETTER THAN THE CRAP HERE.... NO OFFENCE MEANT..

#58
resipsaloquitur - 4 Feb 2009 // 14:51:25

My dearest,dearst NELLIE,

the word"manu" in Spanish means "hand",therefore it ought to be said:

"a manual job".

As it is well knowed,manual jobs in Germany or in Great Britain are better

rewarded as IT jobs in BG,but you must take in consideration living expenses

there are much higher than in BG.

I lived twice in London and in 1999 I paid 955,- BPounds per month rent.


The second time I lived in Chelsea,close to South Kensington and paid 860,-

Pounds just for a studio.

Food is not so expensive but of very low quality.

#57
Lotus - 4 Feb 2009 // 03:02:31

DP,

Thank you. Would love to. I almost made it to Ontario last summer. Possibly, in a few months. Now, I need to catch up on some responsibilities here.
Stay warm. Spring will be there.

Rollingstoned,
We HAVE to look for ways to blossom even in the mud, or at least try. Otherwise, the swamp will swallow us...

Friends, countrymen!
Later

#56
xNELLIEx - 4 Feb 2009 // 02:15:19

resi

"I read the article and felt the air of PREVUZXODSTVO of the British journalist."

You and kolega are too sensitive, or maybe you both have inferiority complexes? Chips on your shoulders? Or maybe you don't read English well enough? I read the article and did not feel any such nonsense. This Bulgarian guy is probably better educated and more intelligent than his British boss, so what do the Brits have to feel superior about? That the menial jobs in England pay better than the information technology jobs in Bulgaria? That boy should come to the US and become a plumber and make $100/hour.

#55
DP - 4 Feb 2009 // 02:05:34

"If you can, take a week in California. Let me know. I will meet you if you come."

Love to meet you, Lotus. But no rest for the wicked ;-) However if you get tired of the heat and decide to travel North, we can meet here. :-)

#54
resipsaloquitur - 4 Feb 2009 // 01:57:00

CBJ,

What KOLLEGIAN is kritisizing is the way the article is written.

Than "The ton makes the music!"

I read the article and felt the air of PREVUZXODSTVO of the British journalist.

#53
DP - 4 Feb 2009 // 00:31:30

"DP I don't know how to make that clear..."

Kolegialen,

It is clear now. The original language you used was missing a couple of words which you added later and clarified your statement for me. Thank you.


The Act I had in mind is the following one:

"Expropriation of Large Urban Housing Property Act (SG No. 87/1948; emnd,
No. 91/1948)"

You are right in stating that the nationalisation started in 1947 with amendments made to the different acts in 1948 and even on a later date. The one I remember (concerning the Large Urban Property) is the one that affected people in Sofia and the tragic consequences in some cases that I still recall.

#52
Lotus - 4 Feb 2009 // 00:06:52

DP,

The wind wouldn't be good. I only had 5 min outside when it was blowing. Plus, I experienced down to -10C, -13C.

Well, there is still at least Feb and March of winter, right? If you can, take a week in California. Let me know. I will meet you if you come.

Lotus

#51
DP - 3 Feb 2009 // 23:48:02

"So, enjoy the freshness of your winter. I am back in Los Angeles and it is hot."

Lotus,

Are you kidding? Enjoying -20C (wind chill factor included) for over a month? Just survive will do. Enjoy the heat and don't forget your sun screen.

#50
Kolegialen - 3 Feb 2009 // 23:21:09

DP I don't know how to make that clear: Nellie kept confusing ownership of industry with restitution.

Property rights concern both, but she brought up restitution.
I was trying to explain to her, that not having clear owners of the industry lead to much corruption which would have in any country. She came back that property was returned, which I explain was irrelevant, because the industry wasn't subject to restitution since most of it didn't exist prior to 1947.
Nationalization started in 1947.

#49
Lotus - 3 Feb 2009 // 23:12:18

Hey, DP

I did see snow! I had my little winter vacation and really enjoyed the crisp, cold air and the "smell" of winter. I ran through deep virgin snow and it gave me an incredible high. I enjoyed being near a fireplace with a warm company.

So, enjoy the freshness of your winter. I am back in Los Angeles and it is hot.

Lotus

#48
DP - 3 Feb 2009 // 21:00:33

"appropriation"

Kolegialen,

If you had mentioned that word "appropriation" along with restitution I would have not been talking about Kremikovtsi in the way I did for it would have been in context in the first place.

#47
DP - 3 Feb 2009 // 20:51:38

"DP my point is not about what was and what wasn't nationalized, but about the fact that in 1989 we found ourselves in a land without clear property rights for and ownership the industrial means. No laws either.

Free for all. If UK or US went through the same, my guess is that they will be even more corrupt, being the greedy and nasty people that they are..."

Kolegialen,

My point is that it was not the lack of laws but the transition of a society ruled by decrees and not laws. The bureaucrats had the ultimate power and they were the Law. The Russians went through the same thing in a much bigger way. Look how their oligarchs acquired the natural resources of Russia: A stamp on a form and a smile.

The most corrupt area in all that process of restitution was the way it was done regarding the land. And it was done by Law. Putting aside the simple mechanics, there was such a grand incompetence on the part of the government when a law was accepted limiting the restitution of land to 300 decars when allowing people to acquire thousands of acres by buying it. Why? To facilitate a pure thievery of the land securing availability and low prices.

#46
Kolegialen - 3 Feb 2009 // 20:16:47

Sorry DP but I the sentence "and not really industrial facilities, most of which were not existing in 1947 any way." means that restitution didn't really effect industry.

Don't know where you read anything about nationalizing Kremikovci in the 40's.
I was not talking about restitution - Nellie was.

I was talking about appropriation of state own industry, - a process that would lead directly to unprecedented corruption in any country.

#45
DP - 3 Feb 2009 // 20:05:55

"Not until the mid - 90's there was a serious attempt to restitute property and not really industrial facilities, most of which were not existing in 1947 any way.
Who owned Stomana or Kremikovci? (extreme examples) in 1947?."

Kolegialen,

Since you are talking about restitution of private property nationalised in 1948 (1947?) mention of non-existent industries seem out of context and I did not get your meaning. I still don't. Kremikovtsi was state owned and there is no question regarding that.

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