KEYWORDS TODAY:   KOSTOVISLAMIC STATEWESTERN BALKANSUKRAINEMINIMUM WAGE

Bulgaria Orthodox Church Honors Trifon Zarezan Day

Society | February 1, 2009, Sunday // 00:00| Views: 4810 | Comments: 24
  • Send to Kindle
Bulgaria Orthodox Church Honors Trifon Zarezan Day: Bulgaria Orthodox Church Honors Trifon Zarezan Day The Bulgarian Orthodox Church honors Sunday, February 1, the Day of Saint Trifon, patron of vine-growers, wine-producers and tavern-keepers. Photo by Sofia Photo Agency

The Bulgarian Orthodox Church honors Sunday, February 1, the Day of Saint Trifon, patron of vine-growers, wine-producers and tavern-keepers.

The holiday is widely known in Bulgaria as Trifon Zarezan - from the Bulgarian verb "zariazvam" meaning to prune vines.

Saint Trifon was born in 225 AD in the village of Kossada in Phrygia in Asia Minor. His parents were righteous people, who, from very early age, thought him love and devotion to God. Their efforts soon proved successful because Trifon began accomplishing miracles since childhood. He became famous at the age of 17 when he cured the daughter of the Roman Emperor Gordian. Unfortunately, Gordian was succeeded by Decius, who prosecuted Christians, and in 250 AD Trifon was arrested, tortured and decapitated.

In Bulgaria, the day of Saint Trifon was initially celebrated on February 14. Under the Communist regime, the Holiday was largely known as the "Day of the Vine-Grower". In 1968, when the Bulgarian Orthodox Church introduced the Gregorian calendar, the Church began honoring Saint Trifon on February 1, while February 14 remained the vine-growers' Day.

Many Bulgarians still continue to celebrate Trifon Zarezan on February 14 - one of the very few holidays to be still honored according to the old calendar. In recent years, Trifon Zarezan coincides with Saint Valentine's Day - a holiday largely unknown in Bulgaria during the Communism, but acquiring greater and greater popularity.

Bulgarians celebrate Trifon Zarezan with folkloric rituals in vineyard villages throughout the country. The men set out to prune the vines while the women bake festive bread loaves and prepare roast chicken stuffed with rice. Each vine-grower leaves for the vineyard with the bread and the chicken in a new, colorful woven bag and with a vessel (buklitsa) filled with red wine. Before the pruning begins, men turn to the sun and make the sign of the cross three times. After the first three twigs are cut, they wash them with the red wine, holy water and wood ashes that they had kept since Christmas Eve. At the end of the day, everyone gathers together to eat, drink wine, sing and dance. The man who harvested most grapes in the year is appointed "King". He and his subjects must traditionally get drunk to ensure a good harvest the following year.

There are many different folklore versions of the way this Day is celebrated in different parts of the country as well as many different legends about who Trifon was. However, ethnographers are unanimous that the celebrations are rooted in the ancient Dionysus festivities, celebrating Dionysus - the God of Wine, who was known to have thought people everywhere he went how to grow vines and make wine. The celebrations were accompanied by rampant outdoor games and parties.
Society » Be a reporter: Write and send your article
Expats.bg All Are Welcome! Join Now!

Leave a comment


» To the forumComments (24)
#24
Bill - 1 Feb 2009 // 23:30:46

Nellie:

"
The new Euro language:

The European Union commissioners have announced that agreement has been reached to adopt English as the preferred language for European communications, rather than German, which was the other possibility. As part of the negotiations, Her Majesty's Government conceded that English spelling had some room for improvement and has accepted a five-year phased plan for what will be known as EuroEnglish (Euro for short).

In the first year, "s" will be used instead of the soft "c". Sertainly, sivil servants will resieve this news with joy. Also, the hard "c" will be replaced with "k". Not only will this klear up konfusion, but typewriters kan have one less letter.

There will be growing publik emthusiasm in the sekond year, when the troublesome "ph" will be replaced by "f". This will make words like "fotograf" 20 per sent shorter.

In the third year, publik akseptanse of the new spelling kan be expekted to reach the stage where more komplikated changes are possible.

Governments will enkorage the removal of double letters, which have always ben a deterent to akurate speling. Also, al wil agre that the horible mes of silent "e"s in the languag is disgrasful, and they would go.

By the fourth year, peopl wil be reseptiv to steps such as replasing "th" by z" and "w" by v

During ze fifz year, ze unesesary "o" kan be dropd from vords kontaining "ou", and similar changes vud of kors be aplid to ozer kombinations of leters.

After zis fifz yer, ve vil hav a reli sensibl riten styl. Zer vil be no mor trubls or difikultis and evrivun vil find it ezi tu understand ech ozer.

Ze drem vil finali kum tru!"

This is merely an updated version of something that's been around for a generaton or two.

#23
xNELLIEx - 1 Feb 2009 // 22:24:58

Bill

The new Euro language:

The European Union commissioners have announced that agreement has been reached to adopt English as the preferred language for European communications, rather than German, which was the other possibility. As part of the negotiations, Her Majesty's Government conceded that English spelling had some room for improvement and has accepted a five-year phased plan for what will be known as EuroEnglish (Euro for short).

In the first year, "s" will be used instead of the soft "c". Sertainly, sivil servants will resieve this news with joy. Also, the hard "c" will be replaced with "k". Not only will this klear up konfusion, but typewriters kan have one less letter.

There will be growing publik emthusiasm in the sekond year, when the troublesome "ph" will be replaced by "f". This will make words like "fotograf" 20 per sent shorter.

In the third year, publik akseptanse of the new spelling kan be expekted to reach the stage where more komplikated changes are possible.

Governments will enkorage the removal of double letters, which have always ben a deterent to akurate speling. Also, al wil agre that the horible mes of silent "e"s in the languag is disgrasful, and they would go.

By the fourth year, peopl wil be reseptiv to steps such as replasing "th" by z" and "w" by v

During ze fifz year, ze unesesary "o" kan be dropd from vords kontaining "ou", and similar changes vud of kors be aplid to ozer kombinations of leters.

After zis fifz yer, ve vil hav a reli sensibl riten styl. Zer vil be no mor trubls or difikultis and evrivun vil find it ezi tu understand ech ozer.

Ze drem vil finali kum tru!

#22
xNELLIEx - 1 Feb 2009 // 22:09:09

Bill

HAHAHAHA! See what I mean? English is just as bad as French, possibly more so!

#21
Bill - 1 Feb 2009 // 20:59:42

Nellie:

Granted, English isn't particularly phonetic, but I can't think of any words offhand with unpronounced letters, unless you're counting letter combinations for a particular sound.

I do know something a foreign student--I think Norwegian--came up with.

The "ph" in Photograph is pronounced like "f".
The "o" in Women is pronounced like the short "i".
The "ti" in words like Nation are pronounced like "sh".

Using those phonetics, "ghoti" should spell "fish".

#20
xNELLIEx - 1 Feb 2009 // 20:28:11

@Bill

"It's the language I don't like. Never saw another with so many unpronounced letters. It takes the French "eaux" to say "o"."

Oh, that's rich coming from a native English speaker! English is the language with the most silent letters and peculiar pronunciation of words. I learned both as foreign languages, so I know.

#19
DP - 1 Feb 2009 // 20:08:40

"Sadly DP I don’t think Canada can ever be Bulgaria."

Georgy,
It is not sad, but wonderful.
We have been spending every summer 3 to 4 months in Bulgaria and we love it. The difference is that I don't see Canada as grey, boring, and life here more stressful than in Bulgaria. As far as the weather is concerned, I would rather endure the Canadian cold in the comfort of my house here rather than the BG cold in an apartment there. And it is not just BG. The difference is between Europe and North America. It might feel not as cold outside in Northern Europe than in Northern North America, but inside the houses there is no comparison. And as you get older you begin to appreciate comfort more.lol

At the moment you are raising a family (I suppose), paying a mortgage, your leisure time is limited, so when you go to Bulgaria you feel free from all those worries and enjoy yourself. This is part of the charm...

As for the rest, you are preaching to the choir.:-)

#18
Bill - 1 Feb 2009 // 20:03:14

George:

It's the language I don't like. Never saw another with so many unpronounced letters. It takes the French "eaux" to say "o". The pronunciation of certain letter combinations defies comparison with other languages.

#17
xNELLIEx - 1 Feb 2009 // 19:22:43

DP

Beauty is in the eyes of the beholder - yes! And people have different tolerance for beauty and ugliness and different visual standards, imho. I have been trained as an architect, so my standards for beauty and good design are higher than most. I am as snotty and arrogant about beauty as humanly possible. lol

As for Georgie and his better lifestyle in Europe - nothing beats the life style of the American retired. They retire early and live wherever they choose, do whatever they want to do, travel the world, all courtesy of Uncle Sam and the American tax payer. In Bulgaria things are different - is there such a thing as a Bulgarian tax payer? Sure, people have leisure time to do nothing - no jobs, no ambition, no money. What kind of life is that for the young? You must work for 30 years to earn your lifestyle of leisure, imho.

If Obambi wants to solve the financial crisis, he shouldn't start with funding abortion, because children are the future tax payers of the world. He should start by cutting benefits to the old people, even start limiting how many years old people should get benefits. Anyone past the age of 80 should be uthenized.

#16
George Zheliazkov - 1 Feb 2009 // 19:03:53

(Never did like French.)

Watch it Bill my wife is French (Canadian). Just joking ;-)

Yes it’s true, money and finances don’t always equal quality of life. Many billionaires in the US are extremely busy people and have no time for quality life. Very often making money and being engaged doing so is similar to a prison sentence. Rare are the cases when you really like what you are doing and make good money out of it.

So over all I think that Europe is an excellent place to live a life and Bulgaria is lucky to be a part of it.

#15
Bill - 1 Feb 2009 // 18:48:36

George:

It took you a lot of words to say it, but that's the reason I elected to retire here in Europe rather than going back to the States.

I like being king of my table till I'm ready to leave, not having a waiter try to rush me away so he can serve someone else; not getting the bill till I ask for it, not to mention great food. (The US has some great food, too, but it's expensive.)

However, for me at least, one of the biggest reasons was so that I can keep my languages somewhere near in practice. Fifty years ago, my Italian was as fluent as my German is now, and when I returned to the States it took only six months for me to lose it. I knew I didn't want to do that again.

In the meantime, I've picked up a little Russian, a little Czech, and I can still read Spanish and Italian. (Never did like French.) It's this variety that makes even reading road signs a challenge that makes life here more interesting. Back "home" everyone speaks the same language, and there's no such challenge. Dullsville.

#14
George Zheliazkov - 1 Feb 2009 // 18:36:37

Sadly DP I don’t think Canada can ever be Bulgaria. Not only the climate but the way and pace of life are way better in Bulgaria than in Canada. Bulgaria with its rich history, way of life and European location is much richer in quality of life than the conservative, gray and in many ways dull, hectic, expensive and stressful life of the average North American.

Bulgarians on the other hand enjoy way more laid back and careless existence based on traditions and emotions, where money and materialism is way less demanded/noticeable and underlined (this is all over Europe) than in North America. The average Bulgarian has way more free/leisure time, which in many ways is consumed by the mad distances of commuting in North America.

The cities in Bulgaria are way more accessible for pedestrians with the developed down town arrears, in contrast the average North American does everything with their car (which leads to pollution) and prefers to live in the suburbs. Europe over all has way more livable compact cities than North America, which in many ways is achieved by providing more accessible public transportation.

Another major advantage for Bulgaria is its close distance and easy access to the rest of Europe and its medias like TV, radio, newspapers etc. The richness in diversity, and its close proximity for culture, language, traditions, cuisine, history, architecture, arts, music, fashion etc. can’t be found in no other place in the world. Canada on the other hand is somewhat isolated by its location and size based on population.

And last but not least I don’t even think that the average Bulgarian knows anything about stress which on the other hand happens to be a major cause for diseases like cancer, heart conditions etc. in North America.

With few words based on the economy and way of life, Bulgaria is way more peaceful less competitive (economically), culture and emotions rich and enjoyable place for life where tourism and entertainment are preferred and enjoyed.

#13
DP - 1 Feb 2009 // 18:14:19

Nellie,

Canada's natural beauty is awesome. Bulgaria' s nature, on the other hand, is cozy and accessible. I've travelled enough throughout the world to stop exalting over one place and learn to appreciate all places. It makes a difference the emotional attachment one feels for one's birthplace though. One has to be very stupid, imho, not to recognise that fact and keep on insisting on the supreme superiority of one's own country. After all, beauty is in the eyes of the beholder. No?

#12
xNELLIEx - 1 Feb 2009 // 17:59:46

DP

What country in the world has more plentiful or beautiful pine and fir forests than Canada? Norway maybe? As far as untouched natural beauty, nothing can come close to Canada. Forests, lakes, mountains, even beaches if you don't mind the cold water. lol

#11
xNELLIEx - 1 Feb 2009 // 17:55:23

DP

Yes, Bulgaria is beautiful, but nothing out of the ordinary. It resembles many other destinations that have better hotels, food, service and less attitude and arrogance. Speaking objectively, as a traveler, it is not that special. I think Asia, China, India are extraordinary.

Georgie is a great guy, I wouldn't sink my talons into him. I love men who have a sense of humor, like he does, and who can laugh at themselves. lol

#10
xNELLIEx - 1 Feb 2009 // 17:45:57

Georgie Boy

"Whatever it takes girls, whatever it takes, we the Bulgarian men (forget about the French) are here to please you!"

Hmmmm..........Doesn't sound like a Bulgarian man, you been living too long in Canada, Georgie. Bulgarian men get that way after living in the US or Canada. I call them US-improved Bulgarians. The Bulgarian men left in Bulgaria don't even think about any woman who is over 30 years old and does not look like a runway model. Ask Kolega. Bulgarian men don't know that women over 30 have hormones too. lol

Bulgaria news Novinite.com (Sofia News Agency - www.sofianewsagency.com) is unique with being a real time news provider in English that informs its readers about the latest Bulgarian news. The editorial staff also publishes a daily online newspaper "Sofia Morning News." Novinite.com (Sofia News Agency - www.sofianewsagency.com) and Sofia Morning News publish the latest economic, political and cultural news that take place in Bulgaria. Foreign media analysis on Bulgaria and World News in Brief are also part of the web site and the online newspaper. News Bulgaria