EC Firmly Snubs Bulgaria over Nuke Units Reopening

Politics » BULGARIA IN EU | January 31, 2008, Thursday // 00:00| Views: | Comments: 55
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Bulgaria: EC Firmly Snubs Bulgaria over Nuke Units Reopening Units 5 and 6 are the last still operating at Kozloduy. Bulgaria shut down the other four units under pressure from the EU, which feels the old Soviet-made reactors were unsafe. File photo by Nadya Kotseva (Sofia Photo Agency)

Bulgaria's hopes to reopen two of the units at its sole nuclear power plant Kozloduy that were decommissioned upon its EU accession, have been dealt a new blow at the European Parliament.

"Bulgaria is facing an economic crisis more severe than the financial collapse of the 90s in the wake of the shutting down of Kozloduy units 3 and 4," Hristo Hristov, head of the Energy Institute, said on Wednesday at the European Parliament.

He joined a debate on the future of the energy resources on the Balkans, organized by MEPs from GERB, the popular centre-right party of Sofia mayor Boyko Borisov.

Hristov warned that Bulgaria will be forced to reopen the two units unilaterally and quit the CO2 trading scheme of the European Union, should Brussels stand its ground against the reopening of the two nuclear units.

"This is a closed issue for us," Christian Waeterloos, head of the nuclear energy directorate with the European Commission, said in the parliamentary hall.

He advised Bulgaria's politicians to seek alternative ways of financing to make up for the energy shortage due and ruled out a new peer review of the units.

Bulgaria had to shut down the twin 440 M units 3 and 4 at the plant hours before it joined the EU in January 2007, but has not given up on the prospect of firing them back up.

Bulgaria could lease two units at its Kozloduy nuclear power plant to the foreign firm that will help lobby for their restart, Bulgarian prime minister Sergey Stanishev announced in the middle of January.

The country's accession treaty stipulates that the reactors can be fired up if all other EU member states agree to sign an annex in that sense, but some countries have proven reluctant to do so, Stanishev said.

Sofia estimates the lost revenue from shutting down the two reactors at EUR 2,5 B and argues that the units pose no danger, a point of view that is not shared by the EU.
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» To the forumComments (55)
#55
Taro - 3 Feb 2008 // 18:44:12

resip,

but not the gerundivum we are talking about. The gerundivum can act like an adjective and change his position relative to the subject.

Anyway, we are completly off topic.
;-)

Greets
Taro

#54
resipsaloquitur - 3 Feb 2008 // 18:04:19

Taro,

the Past Participal in Latin comes always at the end.

#53
CreepyS - 3 Feb 2008 // 13:55:35

Larz,

Veselo prekarvane bratced. Tuka e super veselo ama navanka e studeno i sitcki kracmi u Altstadt sa pretapkani. Mene nai mi aresa u edin brazilski coctail bar kade se sabirat sitcki brazilci na dГјsseldorf. Brazilkite sa super tanciorki, kva chalga kvi 5 lea - kato pocnat nema spirane brato, mnogo sa dobri i mnogo sexy.

Ia nablegam na pilz i weizen oti taia dГјsseldorfska alt nesto ne mi aresva - em ne se napivash kato orata em glava te boli na drugio den.

Are HELAU!!

#52
Taro - 2 Feb 2008 // 21:38:26

George,

well, money is a fact, but canВґt be always an excusion for everything, like you say, jogging in the park doesnВґt cost so much.
On the other hand I know a newly opened fitness studio in Varna, which charges 200lv or 100 Euro per month!!! Even in the highly equiped studios in German I donВґt pay that much. I suppose that only some mutri girlfriends going to "exercise" there...

I plan to settle down in Varna, so I hope this is the right place not only for living but also for a capoeira academy.

I hope one day I can invite you for a training with me.
;-)

Greets
Taro

#51
George Zheliazkov - 2 Feb 2008 // 20:48:00

Taro,

Yeah it used to be like this Taro I’m serious, people used to exercise and gyms were for free (that’s 18 years ago). I’m 39 now. When I was back there they (trainers, coaches) used to come and talk to us about sports from an early in school and used to attract many healthy kids in different sports. Now I guess the economy and way of life is so messed up that people are more in a survival mode. Also everything costs money and sports too (not the jogging in the park of course).
Yes I’m sure that you will get some students in Capoeira, I don’t know much about it but I’ve seen some moves on TV. You should try to locate in a bigger city Sofia, Varna, Plovdiv or Burgas where you will have larger market and more open minds.

So then I know next time I come to Bulgaria and see a Capoiera school it must be Taro. ;-)

#50
LarzBGR - 2 Feb 2008 // 20:17:40

Creepy,

Баце, как е при вас? Ние сега потегляме към Кьолн и ще се усмъртиме:)))

#49
LarzBGR - 2 Feb 2008 // 20:09:24

I knew you were going to say this. No, I am not comparing myself to any revolutionary, but I was addressing your pretty absurd idea about the influence of distance over a human being;) Love will prevail, Wildthing, distance cannot kill it;) Anyhow, I already started with the beers so it might be a better idea to continue posting tomorrow;)

KГ–LLE ALAAF!!!!!!!!

#48
Taro - 2 Feb 2008 // 19:17:19

Hi George,

maybe you are an exception. ;-)

In Bg I saw less people jogging in parks or beaches, riding bicycles or do other exercises outside. They usually like to drive by car even shortest ways instead of walking, ok, those who can afford a car. As also a healthy lifestyle isnВґt so common in Bg.

Well, I didnВґt look inside of sport clubs or fitness studios yet.

I am a trainer of Capoeira, an afro-brazilian martial art and I am planning to open a Capoeiraschool in Bg. So I hope, that I can find open minded people who also wants to exercise and have fun with it.

Greets
Taro

#47
wildthing - 2 Feb 2008 // 17:43:57

So, now we are not only great patriots, but revolutionaries as well, Larz! Don't you go too far? Next step has to be to die for your country like they did! To think of it - this is not very improbable for a future lower in Bulgaria with all the shady clients they have there! ;-)
Good intentions are worth nothing until you put them in practice, but to be successful in that you first need to know the problems and the obstacles, and you seem to ignore there are any in Bulgaria.

#46
George Zheliazkov - 2 Feb 2008 // 17:37:08

Taro,

I never made any Dan; I’m the type of guy who likes mixing the arts and do not strictly stick to only one of them (too bad I’m getting kind of old for UFC). At the time of training I could probably cover 3rd Dan. I wasn’t entirely honest with my Japanese though; I also have another almost 3 years in judo, which taught me more sentences in Japanese (the names of the techniques).

Judging by your impressions on Bulgarians that they are not so much in sports I conclude that you know Bulgaria for a short time. We did have lots of sports in the old days and lots of Olympic and world medals, but then again sports were free and the leisure time was plenty. In fact I had a lifetime of sports before I left the country, starting with athletics, lots of boxing (over 100 fights), some kickboxing, judo and finally karate (never liked the kata). Now I live in Canada and almost don’t have time for anything including sports.

Ten years ago or so I lived in Vancouver and had few friendly rounds (boxing) with the only Canadian Olympics bronze medallist Dale Walters, he owns a gym in down town (he is a good guy, turned pro but never made it) Vancouver and I used to practice there (the Bentall Centere) / and nothing much since then.
http://www.bentallcentreathleticclub.com
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dale_Walters

Anyways it’s an Olimpic year and I will put my predictions in gold medals:

First place China
Second place Russia
Third place USA


Watch Bulgaria, it may end up getting more medals than Japan. ;-)

#45
Taro - 2 Feb 2008 // 17:20:04

"Hey Taro,
in Latin is :

PACTA SERVANTA SUNT...Die Verträge mussen eingehalten werden!

Erstes Semester in der Juristische Schule."

Dann hast du nicht gut aufgepasst. Es muss heiГџen servanDa.
Ob man nun pacta servanda sunt oder pacta sunt servanda schreibt, ändert nichts an der Bedeutung und ist nur eine stilistische Frage. Servanda ist Gerundivum (es muss eingehalten werden), servanta ist Partizip Perfekt Passiv (PPP). Ein Partizip ist ein Verb, das wie ein Adjektiv (Frage: Wie oder was) dekliniert werden kann. Also auf das obige Beispiel angewendet: Die Verträge sind eingehalten worden. Ich finde das ist schon ein Unterschied.

Ich hatte 8 Jahre Latein an der Schule.

Danke für das Gespräch.

;-)

GruГџ
Taro

P.S.: Kennst du den Film Das Leben des Brian?

#44
CreepyS - 2 Feb 2008 // 17:10:12

Haha, Larz,

There is no need to talk about "the circumstances" that would send you in Alaska and to involve the BG revolutionaires from the 19th century in a talk meant to defend petty opportunism.

#43
resipsaloquitur - 2 Feb 2008 // 17:09:04

Taro is talking nonsense!

"I have the genes of two of the richest countries in the world!"

The German Government may be is rich...regrettably many Germans nowdays begg on the streets of the big cities or sleep rough.
Yesterday i helped a homeless German man with preparation of all papers,necessary to get a flat,paid by the Sozial Amt.

He is sleeping at the moment in the Railway station as long as the Authorities decide his case.
TARO is picturing GERMANY as the paridise on this Planet.
The reality is many Germans live just from pay check to pay check and can not afford to travel anymore.
But as typical Germans,they will never admit they are poor...
vice versa they are saying they take holidays in Germany in order to protect ther environment.

Hypoctitits!

#42
LarzBGR - 2 Feb 2008 // 16:56:55

"all you can show is mere good intentions for the farthest future."

Good intentions, Wildthing, are more important than you can possibly imagine. It's always the first step;)

#41
LarzBGR - 2 Feb 2008 // 16:51:11

Wildthing, you are preposterous. I might merry an Argentinian, and due to the circumstances live in Alaska, US, how is that supposed to change the fact that I feel love for my country and I would always go back there, no matter what?! If you've read history then you should know that many of Bulgaria's revolutionaries used to live outside Bulgaria during the Ottoman yoke and still promoted their ideas and returned, showing the world what the Bulgarian people were actually going through.
Furthermore, dear Wildthing, I am not preaching anything, pointless patriotism the least. I am simply getting annoyed when idiots like Furian spread bullshit online. Bulgaria needs hard work, nobody denies the facts, but Bulgaria also needs people who work in a spirit of optimism and keeping up the Bulgarian spirit.
What's wrong about this idea?

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