Excavations Unveil One of Five Most Important Temples for Bulgarian Archaeology

Society » ARCHAEOLOGY | September 3, 2015, Thursday // 17:14| Views: | Comments: 10
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Bulgaria: Excavations Unveil One of Five Most Important Temples for Bulgarian Archaeology Photo: bTV

Excavations works on the new sewage system in Silistra unveiled what specialists believe will turn out to be one of the five most important temples for the Bulgarian archaeology.

The remains of the medieval church were discovered during the construction of the new water purification system, private bTV stations informs.

A quarter of a century ago, archaeologists discovered episcopal patriarchal basilica on the banks of the Danube river possessing all the attributes characteristic of a cathedral temple.

None of the specialists expected that another patriarchal church can be located ninety metres away from the first one.

Both of the churces date back to the time of the First Bulgarian Empire.

According to the archaeologist from the Regional Historical Museum in Silistra, Georgi Atanasov, the two churches functioned jointly for a long period of time.

The practice of episcopal centres to have two temples is known from the times of early Christianity.

Thirty graves have also been uncovered at the site, which will shed further light on the discovery.

The ratio between children and adults found in the graves was 50:50, which hinted of high child mortality at the time.

Atanasov assured that the ruins were not those of an ordinary town church, but rather the mother-temple of the Bulgarian patriachate, where the throne of the first Bulgarian patriarchs was located.

After carrying out careful explorations, the newly discovered temple will be conserved and covered in anticipation of future specialists and solid funding.

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Tags: Bulgaria, archaeology, temple, church, Silistra, First Bulgarian Empire, danube, patriachate, patriarch, cathedral, Christianity, basilica
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» To the forumComments (10)
#10
GrueFsk - 4 Sep 2015 // 18:58:26

Addition:
Only between Romanians and Albanians but that's because Romanians are Romanized Albanians/Thracians, it is a totally different situation. Romanized Illyrians were called Dalmatians and they used to speak a now-defunct Romance language, the Dalmatian, that had very few things in common with Albanian, much contrary to Romanian language. It didn't even belong to Balkansprachbund, Balkan Linguistic Union/Community/Communion, unlike Romanian, Aromanian, Moglenite/Moglen/Meglenite/Meglen Vlach and Istrian/Istria Vlach. Bulgarian language (including the F YROMian "language" and the Torlak Bg dialects in Serbia, the "dialects of Serbian" of the so-called "Old Shtokavian" type) is the only Slavic language that is member of this Balkansprachbund. Serbian and modern Greek (Neo-Greek, New Greek) are only marginally affected by the traits/features of this linguistic union.

"What I meant to say is that the most intensive symbiosis Romanians have been involved into during their Middle Ages (and throughout their history in general) was that with the Slavs."

#9
GrueFsk - 4 Sep 2015 // 18:48:51

What I meant to say is that the most intensive symbiosis Romanians have been involved into during their Middle Ages (and throughout their history in general) was that with the Slavs. That's why they ended up with 2/5 or so of their vocabulary of Slavic origin, that's why they ended up adopting Slavic first names (christen(ing) names): Staicu, Raicu, Stancu, Vlad, Mircea, Bogdan, Dragos and so on (most of them archaic now) and so on. This has NOT happened between Romanians and Greeks (only between Aromanians and Greeks but, then again, Aromanians are not Romanians and have never been such), Romanians and Armenians, Romanians and Hungarians and so on.

On other line of thoughts, during the Middle Ages Romanians were under the hegemony of Slavs only, that's why most of the names of the localities in Wallachian, Moldovan and Banat parts of Romania are Slavic, in Transylvania and Partium (comprising the so-called "Crisana" and Maramures regions) regions besides the "normal" avalanche of Hungarian placenames there are also many Slavonic ones (many of them pre-dating the Hungarian-language ones).

#8
GrueFsk - 4 Sep 2015 // 17:10:41

Shameless despicable "superior" Romanians! :(

#7
GrueFsk - 4 Sep 2015 // 17:10:11

Romanians, return the parts of Saints Emilian and Dasius that you begged from Bg in order to pray to them that you will re-steal what you wrongly call South(ern) Dobr(o)uja in the future and, obviously, to pray for other things as well and that Bulgarians (Bg Orthodox Church, Bg political authorities, ordinary Bg) were so naive to give you as gifts! If you hate Bulgaria, and you do, why be such hypocritical asholes to ask them for gifts, and not any sort of gifts, gifts from the Bg people in the region that you had thuggishly conquered and occupied, whose grandparents and great-grandparents you were in the business of murdering without any justification (you meaning both vigilante civilians or soldiers) after you had stolen their Bg citizenship, and, on top of that, SACRED GIFTS (relics of saints) from the same region the Bulgarian inhabitants of which you were busy crucifying during 1913-1916 and 1918-1940, that you probably use for praying to get a second chance at stealing again the region where those SACRED GIFTS originate from.

#6
GrueFsk - 4 Sep 2015 // 14:53:55

Please turn down any eventual o ffers from Ro "archeologists" or "historians" or whatsoever Romanians may come proposing you collaborations.

#5
GrueFsk - 4 Sep 2015 // 14:51:49

The word for Kaliakra in Romanian is "Kaliakra" or "Caliacra" (the latter for either uncultured spellers or for the ones that consider it part of Romania and therefore use no "k" in spelling its name, contrary to the way they spell Kozloduy -- either Kozlodui or Kozloduy -- pretty much never spelled Cozlodui as if it still were part of Romania, BECAUSE it did not belong to GREATER ROMANIA (unlike Kaliakra Cape, Balchik and others).
Had it been inherited straight from Latin language (which is the only natural way for that word/name to enter Romanian language, had the Romanians been indigenous in that area) it should/would have been either Acra or Acrele/Acrii. No way would have the "indigenous" Romanians who had preserved the Latin ethnonym "Romanus" from the Romans in a slightly different form, the latters having been the masters/conquerors/occupators of that territory (South Dobruja, Kaliakra included) and also masters of the local, pre-Roman Greeks (from ancient times and up until the Hellenization of the Eastern Roman Empire) in the nearby localities Dionysopolis (present-day Balchik) and Bizone/Byzone.

#4
Sorry, only the word o ffer is banned - 4 Sep 2015 // 14:38:47

I bet Ro "archaeologists" will be inviting themselves pretty soon to "provide a ssistance" to their "dear beloved" Bg colleagues, maybe even o ffer some f unding, anything just to take part in archaeological work in the "rightfully Romanian" "South Dobrujan" (!!!) territory of Silistra.
On other line of thoughts, during the Middle Ages Romanians were under the hegemony of Slavs only, that's why most of the names of the localities in Wallachian, Moldovan and Banat parts of Romania are Slavic, in Transylvania and Partium (comprising the so-called "Crisana" and Maramures regions) regions besides the "normal" avalanche of Hungarian placenames there are also many Slavonic ones (many of them pre-dating the Hungarian-language ones).
However Kali Akra is no Slavonic name and, in fact, there were two Latin names for this cape: Acra and Acres Castellum, none of which inherited into Romanian, the language of the supposed continous inhabitants of the immediate region, the Romanians.

#3
Why have you banned me? - 4 Sep 2015 // 14:37:05

Well the two of us don't share the opinion on what is an appropriate comment then.

#2
bg-man - 4 Sep 2015 // 07:26:58

You know sometimes you people read one thing and comment on something entirely different... I will provide an example of what comments should look like.

Wow what a great find, I cant wait for it all to be uncovered and to see the results. It looks like Bulgaria has stumbled on a lot of "buried treasure" in the past couple months and it exciting to follow all of these new excavations. Good luck and Gods speed!

#1
GrueFsk - 3 Sep 2015 // 20:10:25

How about some "solid funding" in the next few days or, at least, in 2016? Or are you waiting for the Romanians to come and steal again what they wrongly call South Dobruja?
Silistra is not located in Dobruja/Scythia Minor, it is located in Moesia proper, Scythia Minor -- the original/initial/genuine/real Dobruja -- only extended as far as the Romanian Danube-bank locality Rasova, leaving the southwesternmost corner of present-day Ro Constanta county outside of Dobruja and, of course, everything starting with Silistra to the west in Bulgaria's Silistra region.
Interestingly though Silistra was part of Bulgarian church/patriarchy whereas Varna was directly under the jurisdiction of the Greek Patriarch in Constantinople which goes to say that most of the people there were Slavs of Bg type, unlike the ones on the Black Sea coastline who were mixed, many of them being Greeks, hence the Greek-language placename Kaliakra (Kalli Akra) preserved to this day. Cape Kaliakra is located close to Varna, north of it.

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